Herbert Spencer on the Americans and the Americans on Herbert Spencer: Being a Full Report of His Interview, and of the Proceedings of the Farewell Banquet of Nov. 11, 1882

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D. Appleton, 1882 - 96 sayfa
 

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Sayfa 13 - Municipal organizations — who manipulate your caucuses and conventions, and run your partisan campaigns — all educated men ? And has their education prevented them from engaging in, or permitting, or condoning, the briberies, lobbyings, and other corrupt methods which vitiate the actions of your administrations ? Perhaps party newspapers exaggerate these things ; but what am I to make of the testimony of your civil service reformers — men of all parties ? If I understand the matter aright,...
Sayfa 40 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Sayfa 14 - ... when the straw implies a principle. If, as you say of the American, he pauses to consider whether he can afford the time and trouble — whether it will pay, corruption is sure to creep in. All these lapses from higher to lower forms begin in trifling ways, and it is only by incessant watchfulness that they can be prevented. As one of your early statesmen said — •"The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.
Sayfa 53 - Then sawest thou that this fair universe, were it in the meanest province thereof, is in very deed the Stardomed City of God ; that through every star, through every grass-blade, and most through every living soul, the glory of a present God still beams.
Sayfa 16 - The Republican form of government is the highest form of government ; but because of this it requires the highest type of human nature — a type nowhere at present existing.
Sayfa 13 - Of course, ambitious and unscrupulous men will secure the offices, and education will aid them in their selfish purposes. But would not those purposes be thwarted, and better government secured, by raising the standard of knowledge among the people at large ? Very little. The current theory is that if the young are taught what is right, and the reasons why it is right, they will do what is right when they grow up. But considering what religious teachers have been doing these two thousand years, it...
Sayfa 8 - HAS what you have seen answered your expectations ? It has far exceeded them. Such books about America as I had looked into had given me no adequate idea of the immense developments of material civilization which I have everywhere found. The extent, wealth, and magnificence of your cities, and especially the splendour of New York, have altogether astonished me.
Sayfa 10 - I was thinking the other day. After pondering over what I have seen of your vast manufacturing and trading establishments, the rush of traffic in your street-cars and elevated railways, your gigantic hotels and Fifth Avenue palaces, I was suddenly reminded of the Italian Republics of the Middle Ages ; and recalled the fact that while there was growing up in them great commercial activity, a development of the arts -which made them the envy of Europe, and a building of princely mansions which continue...
Sayfa 14 - ... that the common citizen, educate him as you like, will habitually occupy himself with his personal affairs, and hold it not worth his while to fight against each abuse as soon as it appears. Not lack of information, but lack of certain moral sentiment, is the root of the evil.
Sayfa 14 - Free institutions can be maintained only by citizens, each of whom is instant to oppose every illegitimate act, every assumption of supremacy, every official excess of power, however trivial it may seem. As Hamlet says, there is such a thing as 'greatly to find quarrel in a straw,' when the straw implies a principle.

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