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We were taken on board the Petrel, which landed us in Harwich harbour. I have since been lodged and fed by the kind interference of Mr. Billingsley, Lloyd's agent and Prussian Consul; but I am still suffering much from the exposure to cold, and from not having tasted any food nor had any rest for three days and three nights."

The poor fellow continues under the protection of the Vice-Consul, and has received every medical and other necessary attention.

Monthly Chronicle.

The close of the year draws nigh; and we are happy to announce the arrangements now completed to celebrate the anniversary of the Society.

On Thursday evening, the 26th inst., a sermon will be preached on its behalf, by the Rev. T. Boaz, of Calcutta, at the Weigh-House Chapel, Fish Street Hill, at half-past 6 o'clock.

And on Friday evening, the 27th inst., the annual public meeting of the Society will be held in the great room of the London Tavern, Bishopsgate Street, the Rt. Hon. the Lord Mayor of the city of London having kindly consented to take the chair at 6 o'clock. Several ministers and other gentlemen have promised to take part in the proceedings; and it is hoped that the remembrance of the last delightful anniversary will yet be sufficiently lively to draw together again an assembly of the friends of the Institution as large and enthusiastic as that of last year.

As circumstances have compelled us to hold our meeting earlier this year than usual, we take this opportunity of directing the special attention of our subscribers and friends to this fact; and we would still more earnestly commend it to the notice of the officers of our auxilaries, in order that they may see the importance of losing no time in forwarding their usual remittances. And we have to make this particular request to them, as well as to all those who have kindly undertaken to collect for us by cards or otherwise, or who may happen to have in their possession cash for this Society, that they will be kind enough to forward it, addressed to Mr. Thomas Augustus Fieldwick, (Secretary,) at the Society's offices, 2, Jeffrey Square, St. Mary Axe, not later than the 20th inst., as the accounts for the year will on that day be closed.

We confidently hope that our friends will repeat the kindness which they have manifested on former occasions, and interest themselves in circulating tickets (which may be had at the office) amongst their acquaintance, and inviting them to the meeting.

But while our attention has been considerably engaged by our approaching anniversary, several important meetings have been held, both in London and the country, with very satisfactory results. We refer to these with the greater pleasure as in holding them we have enjoyed the valuable assistance of several ministerial brethren.

We have to repeat our acknowledgments for the kind and efficient aid of the Rev. G. Smith of Poplar, who delivered a powerful discourse on our behalf at the Tabernacle, City Road; to the Rev. H. L. Adams, of Newark, and the Rev. E. Adey, of Leighton Buzzard, for accomplishing a very successful tour in Notts and Derby; to the Rev. T. Timpson, for his assistance in Staffordshire and Shropshire; to the Rev. Dr. Hewlett, for repeating his acceptable visit to Uxbridge; to the Rev. J. Adey, for preaching for the Society at Hammersmith; and to the Rev. Messrs. R. S. Bailey, H. Harrison, and W. Woodhouse, for their valuable services at the Sailors' Church.

In addition to these, Capt. J. Lewis, of Milford, as will be seen from his report, has been accompanied by Capt. Evans, in a tour through South Wales, and sermons have been preached or meetings attended by the Society's Minister or Secretary at Braintree, Windsor, Henley on Thames, Tottenham, and Manchester. Several new auxiliaries have thus been formed, and the cause in other places revived under very promising and encouraging circumstances. The annual meeting of the East London Auxiliary has also been held, but want of space forbids us on this occasion referring to it at greater length. We cannot, however, omit the fact, as an interesting example to the ladies of other localities, that at the meeting of the Uxbridge Association a second Bethel Flag, made by the ladies themselves, was presented to the Society, to be bestowed upon one of our Bethel captains. The following address accompanied it :The Ladies of the Uxbridge Auxiliary beg to present to the British and

Foreign Sailors' Society a second Bethel Flag. May the Eternal JAH, whose ways are in the whirlwind and the storm, who layeth the beams of his chamber in the waters, who maketh the clouds his chariot, who walketh upon the wings of the wind, deign to inrest the significant Ensign with such an Instrumental power as shall attract the wandering eye, arrest the devious step, arouse the deathless spirits of those who go down to the sea in ships, and do business in great waters, that "many sons shall be brought to glory;"--and it shall be said on that eventful day (for which all other days were made) this and that man were born beneath the lovely emblem of Calvary's blood-stained banner.

Uxbridge, March 15th, 1849.

From the affecting details given in our pages this month of the loss of the emigrant ship " Floridian,” and 164 souls who were on board, the great importance of ship libraries will be clearly seen ; and it is pleasing to be able to report that three large boxes of books and tracts have been requested and despatched to our friends at Padstow, for use on board the emigrant.vessels sailing from that port.

The Reports subjoined present some striking instances of the opposition which our missionaries sometimes meet with, whilst engaged in their work, at the same time that they also show a pleasing increase in the amount of labour accomplished.

SERVICES, ATTENDANCE, AND VISITS.

CIRCULATION OF BIBLES, TESTAMENTS, PARTS OF SCRIPTURE,

TRACTS, AND OLD MAGAZINES.

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Total

55 1212 177 1670 4777 529 483 110 261

186

20

88

37

716 19355 | 566 1585

Day Schools-average attendance of boys, 54. Girls, 45.

Sunday Schools-average attendance of boys, 34. Girls, 35.

Missionary Operations.

PORT OF LONDON.

CAPTAIN PRYNN'S REPORT. In the midst of our multiplied labours, it would be strange were there no discouragements. But, although this is the case, yet they are more than counterbalanced by our encouragements; and whilst the enemies of the Cross would exult in pouring contempt upon the cause in which we are engaged, saying many things that are wrong, yet the Lord reigneth in righteousness, and he will frustrate the designs of wicked men.-It would hardly be supposed that after this Society has been in constant and extensive operation for the space of thirty years, acknowledged and supported by all denominations of Christians, that persons could be found bold and base enough to attempt to impose upon the unsuspecting public, by stating that it no longer erists, that its labours have long since ceased, and that they themselves are solely engaged in the labours which it once professed. But such is even the case, as I myself have found, and that, too, in the port of London, where, it is not saying too much to state, that at no period since the formation of the Society in 1818, (which the writer well recollects,) has there been so many evidences of its usefulness, or such a display of the power of divine grace in the moral and religious character of the sailors of Britain. I trust that, by referring to this subject here, some of the evil results to be expected from this fraud will be averted.

On the river Thames, this past month, my conversation with captains, mates, and sailors, has been of a most pleasing and profitable nature, with however two exceptions. The first, when an uncivil mate of a vessel gave me rather a coarse reception, and insolently asked me what business had on board the vessel. I told him my object was purely for the benefit of himself and other sailors. “Well,” replied he, “stay till you are sent for, before you come here again.” I wished him to take a tract, but he would not; he wanted no tracts; he could get to heaven without tracts or Billes either. I left tracts, however, with some of the crew, and disposed of a Bible to one of them. May the Lord cause his blessing to rest upon the perusal of this book, and may the prejudices of the mate of this vessel give way, and his heart be renewed by the power of divine grace. The other occurred when visiting the vessels in the London Docks, and conversing with a captain lately arrived from Odessa. He said, “I suppose you inake a good thing of it with your Bibles and tracts, but if I know any of my people to have dealings with you, I'll discharge them." I replied, “Sir, you would surely have no oljection to your men or boys having Bibles." “I'll take care there shall be no Bible in my ship, if I know it, and I insist upon your not leaving any of your trash of tracts on board. I will order them to be burnt; and the sooner you leave my ship the better-I don't want such customers as you are.” However, I have since repeated my visit, and left tracts, when the mate told me the captain was a complete deist, and never attended any place of religious worship.What an example for sailors! There were three apprentices in this vessel, what an awful training for those unfortunate youths thus placed !

I have also had two disappointments in my services on the river; one on board a vessel lying at Bell Wharf Tier, where neither Bethel flag nor the well-known signal, the lantern, at night, had been hoisted, but I gathered three together, and two of them and myself prayed, and truly the Lord was in our midst. The other disappointment was, when a meeting was to be held on board the John of Shields, the vessel of our old friend and Christian Captain, John Robson. The violence of the weather, on this occasion, prevented my getting on board. My other services on the river (ten in number) have been well attended, and I trust rendered blessings to many who attended them. Those held on board the Fairy Queen, the Richmond Packet, and the Laura, Harding, in the Upper Pool, were particular seasons of the manifested presence of God; also at those on board the Robert and Ellen, the Wave, and the George and Ann, in the Lower Pool, the prayers of our pious sailors were most earnest and refreshing. I have had an opportunity of conversing with, and also of distributing tracts to many of the inland bargemen, who come down the Thames, and amongst whom, I am happy to say, there are some who love and fear God.

THE SAILORS' CHURCH. The services at the Sailors' Church continue much the same as in my last report; they are of an encouraging nature, and we have reason to hope are owned and honoured of God to the salvation of many souls.

The visitation of sailors' lodging-houses has been attended to, and tracts have been numerously distributed, Bibles sold, conversation held with the sailors, their attention called to attend the means of grace, and at times I have heard the confession, “Oh, sir, I am a poor wicked sailor ; I can't help it—there is no religion on board ships, and when we get on shore, you know, master, we never think about it; so betwixt one and the other there is no wonder if we are cast away at last. This was the language of a sailor to me about three weeks since. It is to be hoped our regular visits to these houses will be attended with salutary effects, through the blessing of God, tu many a prodigal, to many a backslider, to many that are far off, so that they may be brought nigh by the precious blood of Christ.

I have been much engaged in the chambers of the sick and dying, this month; and have been graciously supported in pointing the dying to Christ, and in the attempts to comfort and console those whose minds were filled with fears and doubts. May the Lord bless those visits, and cause all to tend to the glory of his great name !

MR. S. LONSDALE'S REPORT. Another month has passed away, and I am called again to give an account of my work amongst my brother sailors. I trust, that by the grace of God I may do it faithfully, so that when the great day of the Lord shall come I may be able to render in my account with joy. Two or three of the services I have held on shipboard have not been so well attended as I could have wished. On one occasion the tier parted, and two ships near the one in which I had the meeting were taking in their ballast. We only numbered six. Sometimes we find it difficult to persuade the men to attend. Sailors are like other men, naturally disinclined to attend the means of grace, for the carnal mind is, as it always has been, enmity against God. But, notwithstanding, some of our services have been truly encouraging. At one on board of the William, Captain B-, a goodly number were present, and I felt my own soul much blessed while holding forth the Word of Life. At the close of the address the captain engaged in prayer, and after him an old seaman. I was struck with the simplicity and earnestness of his petition. He confessed his

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