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in the haven of eternal repose, in the paradise of God. The trumpeters were blowing their trumpets—the harpers harping with their harps—and all the bells in the city did ring. Brother meets brother, and friend meets friend husbands their wives—parents their children-pastors their flocks. And, above all, there is Jesus and his ransomed people. What a joyful meetinga meeting which shall never be followed by parting. If there be joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, how much must the joy be enhanced at the landing of a whole ship's company in glory? “ There all the ship's company meet, The voyage of life's at an endWho sailed with the Saviour beneath ;

The mortal affliction is past; With shouting ench other they greet, The age that in heaven they spend,

And triumph o'er trouble and death. For ever and ever shall last."

If we find, on examination, that we are on board the Carnal-security, let us forth with leave that vessel, and not be beguiled either by the father of lies or any of bis servants--Shallow, Purblind, Self-conceit, Care-for-nothing, or any other, lest we suffer a wreck that will consign us to irretrievable roin.

Let those who, on strict examination, find that they are on board the Refuge, continue strong in faith--secure a good hope through grace-expand their affections to lay hold of every gracious breeze--and without ceasing pray:

“Come, Lord of hosts, the waves divide,

And land us all in heaven!"

THE VOYAGE OF LIFE.
(From the Churchman's Monthly Penny Magazine.")
It was morn when I saw those two little ships

Heave their anchors and bear away:
If now so far severed at noon's sunny hour,

Ah! what at the close of the day!
How nobly that foremost bark rides o'er the wave,

How ready and steady her crew,
Midst currents and shoals she is watchfully steered,

Her captain a mariner true.
With eye on the compass and hand on the helm,

His course and his reckoning true,
He has spread every inch of his canvas to catch

The favouring gales as they blew.
Not so with the other-she's lagging behind,

The prey of her negligent course:
She stemmed not the current, and caught not the breeze,

She yields to the storm's coming force;
For thick darkness has now enveloped the scene,

And the winds and the thunder roar:
The friends that are waiting to welconie her home

Shall see her, it may be, no more!
O Christian ! beware, on thy heaven-ward course,

Of yielding to indolent ease,
But steadfastly set all thy efforts to catch

The Spirit's soft favouring breeze.
By His power alone thy progress is sped,

But slacken not effort and prayer,
Till entered full sail in the haven of rest,

You safely find anchorage there,

E.

Correspondence.

THE SAILORS’ « WOODEN JESUS."

Exeter, Devon, 4th Nov. 1850. Dear Sir,--I have to thank you for your attention to my communication, inserted in the last Magazine. Many may consider it a bad specimen of my practical seamanship, when they read of steering a ship while moored in Table Bay; whereas the phrase I employed was " sheering wildly,” which every sailor would at once understand. I now endeavour to redeem my promise, by sending a statement of very different results, &c.

When cruising off Vigo in the Indefatigable frigate, Captain Sir Edward Pellew, a Spanish schooner came alongside in a sinking state, with her sails flying about in tatters, and one man labouring at the pump. Our men were ordered in to clear her of her cargo of grain, but she sank before that was accomplished, and one of our men was carried down with her, and was lost. The master and crew had sprung out when she touched our ship, and were sitting on the quarter-deck; when handing their things aft to the captain's cabin, the master eagerly seized a little crucifix (which our sailors jocosely called 's a wooden Jesus”), and most devoutly kissed the feet. The mate did the same, and all the crew, except the old man we observed pumping. Purser's beds were spread for them in the gun-room, and in the morning Sir Edward sent a man down, who spoke Spanish fluently, to see if they had been comfortable. When the man asked the master if he was not thankful to God for sending our ship in the way for their providential escape, he vehemently exclaimed, " Me pray San Antonio, and he send the frigaat to save us.” He was taking this crucifix to St. Andero, in order to get it consecrated by the bishop there, for family use in his house. The little old man told us, that on the same night that they left Vigo, a squall split the foresail, and the captain fell on his knees, praying to St. Antonio to help him. Another squall tore the mainsail—St. Antonio was again implored! and the vessel labouring in the trough of the sea without any sail to steady her, shipped a great deal of water. Then all hands, master, mate, and crew were on their knees, uttering the most pitiable cries to St. Antonio to help them; but, said he, “San Antonio no sailmaker; he not mend the sail, and he no like work; and nobody pump but me.” When asked why he did not pray to St. Antonio, like the others, he said, “Me no care for San Antonio ; me been prisoner in English ship when taken in a French ship; me no see English sailor care for San Antonio in gale of wind, but reef the sail and make all right, and me no care for San Antonio now, for he no help us, and I pump as long as I can to save myself.”

Now, Sir, my object is, that some who read this may, in one sense, take example from this poor ignorant Spanish Papist, who had never been taught to supplicate the Most High God for succour in trouble, but was determined not to perish for want of that exertion which he was enabled to put forth. And I hope the time will never come, when British seamen will be so besotted as to betake themselves simply to praying, when the providence of God calls upon them also for manly exertion. And as your noble institution is intended to lead our sailors to the habitual worship of a Triune God, in seasons of safety and calm, so that they may with confidence lift up their hearts in ejaculatory prayer to God, in the severest storm, while exerting themselves at hauling out and passing an ear-ing, at a weather (or, what is more hazardous, at a lee) yard-arm, in a dark night, I earnestly pray that you may have abundant success in your Christian philanthropy. I greatly rejoice that so many of the masters in the merchant service are now setting a Christian-like example to their men; and am,

Dear Sir, your obedient servant, Mr. T. Fieldwick.

W. GILCHRIST, Rd. Com. R.N.

A REFORMED CREW. The following interesting letter we are happy to insert, not only as a pleasing instance of individual usefulness, but as showing how much the characters of a crew may be moulded and improved by a pious captain, whilst at sea. We would that there were many more such as our excellent friend referred to, Captain Robinson.

“Barque Tropic, Sydney, July 7, 1850. “Dear Sir, I feel the greatest pleasure, as well as considering it my duty, in addressing a few lines to you. Humbly trusting that, through God's blessing, you were the instrument of plucking me as a brand from the fire, (although your reward will be abundantly administered to you, by Him who has provided a rest for his people,) yet since you are labouring in your Master's cause here, and occasionally meet with discouragements, it is but fit you should be sometimes cheered on your road. I have thus taken the liberty to write, and intend to be very plain.

“Your words I shall always remember when we assembled in the cabin. I being no enemy to the cause, but thinking but little of it, entered with the crew, when you began thus,—Psalm ciii. * Bless the Lord O my soul, and forget not all his benefits.' Alas, I had remembered none of them, but had been pursuing vain and empty shadows, ever since I first launched into life. Warnings, mercies, and exhortations, alike made no impression on me. Surely thy Master was at hand and tempered my hard heart to receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save my soul. I now say to you, as a father, that I prize that inestimable treasure above everything else, and I humbly hope I may, through the grace of our blessed Lord, be enabled to endure unto the end. I will now give you a brief account of its further effect on the crew. Our captain, as our guide, shines as a light before us, walking in the Spirit, and therefore not in condemnation. He diligently prepares bis heart, supplicating the gracious influence of the Holy Spirit for himself and for us all." He and I never fail to meet together morning and evening in prayer, and Divine service is always performed on the Sabbath. His example, admonition, and exhortation, together with his moral command and readiness to administer to the temporal comforts of the crew, and educating any of them as they require it, in reading, writing, arithmetic, and navigation, have so wrought on their hearts, by the Divine blessing, that Satan's kingdom has been much weakened, and evil communication and swearing, commonly so prevalent among sailors, but for some time past on the decline, is now rarely heard.

" Your books are getting well read, and I can truly say I never witnessed such a change amongst a set of men. Instead of, as it is frequently with sailors, (who whilst at sea, cut off from the vicious and profligate, store their hearts with wickedness, which breaks forth with greater violence when they arrive in port, for being so long with held,) I trust that, during the passage, they armed themselves against temptation; and now, having arrived in port, some have returned thanks to Him who preserved them across the deep, who never did before, and who hitherto had been unmindful of Him who redeemeth their life from destruction.'

“I have little more to say, only it is to be regretted that there are not more commanders disposed to labour in the same field as yourself, who at sca, shut out, as it were, from the world, and a few of us together, have such an excellent opportunity of improving the morals of a crew, whose minds probably, while on shore, were in an unfit state to receive impressions of this nature. I hope every obstacle will be removed, and the pious labours of such men as yourself, who go about endeavouring to arrest the heedless sinner in the progress of his sin, may by the blessing of God be everywhere crowned with success.

“So I now conclude, trusting to see you well, if it please God I return safe; and requesting your prayers for me. Wishing you every earthly happiness, and an abundant entrance into that rest which remaineth for the people of God, I am, with the greatest respect, your well-wisher,

“HENRY C. FRASER, Mate. “Capt. B. Prynn, Thames Missionary."

Monthly Chronicle.

Our space being this month considerably abridged by the publication of the Preface and Index, we have been unable to insert several interesting papers which we had wished to lay before our readers. Amongst others, we should have referred to circumstances which have recently occurred at Lowestoft, showing the character of the beachmen of that locality, and proving the necessity of a mission such as we announced in our last number we had just commenced. Our friend, Mr. W. Johnson, writes encouragingly of the manner in which his visits have been received; and next month we hope to be able to furnish a report of his proceedings.

In our last we stated that the Directors were in treaty for very eligible premises, for a model lodging-house and reading-room, in the full anticipation of success. We regret, however, to state that our hopes have been disappointed; the owners of the property having urged, as their only objection, the inconvenience they, as immediate residents, might possibly experience from the sailors loitering on the pathway around the door. This objection the Directors did all in their power to remove, but in vain. "Foiled in this instance, inquiries are still being instituted for suitable premises, of which the Directors will not fail to avail themselves, so soon as such shall be found.

We have recently received satisfactory proofs of the successful labours of previous deputations, both from Yarmouth and Epsom ; and we anticipate similar results from the towns in Monmouth, Hereford, and Salop, where our friend, Rev. T. C. Finch, is about to introduce the claims of the Society.

To the annual meeting of the Spa Fields Auxiliary, advertised on the cover, we respectfully invite attention, trusting the public sympathy will be so manifested, by a large attendance and liberal collection, as greatly to encourage our valuable friends in that neighbourhood.

At this season of the year, when festivity and social comfort gladden the heart, we would put in our plea for the tempest-driven mariner ; and we venture to suggest to our friends, that probably, at no season, could an application on his behalf be made with better prospect of a successful result. We earnestly solicit the generous donations of those who have it in their power to afford us their aid ; or if any are disposed to help us, by applying to their friends, we shall be most happy to supply them, on application, with cards for

this purpose.

BB

SERVICES, ATTENDANCE, AND VISITS.

CIRCULATION OF BIBLES, TESTAMENTS, PARTS OF SCRIPTURE,

TRACTS, AND OLD MAGAZINES.

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Day Schools-average attendance of Boys, 72. Girls, 61,

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