Remembering the Roman People: Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature

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OUP Oxford, 30 Haz 2011 - 288 sayfa
In the Roman republic, only the People could pass laws, only the People could elect politicians to office, and the very word republica meant 'the People's business'. So why is it always assumed that the republic was an oligarchy? The main reason is that most of what we know about it we know from Cicero, a great man and a great writer, but also an active right-wing politician who took it for granted that what was good for a small minority of self-styled 'best people' (optimates) was good for the republic as a whole. T. P. Wiseman interprets the last century of the republic on the assumption that the People had a coherent political ideology of its own, and that the optimates, with their belief in justified murder, were responsible for the breakdown of the republic in civil war.
 

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İçindekiler

Introduction
1
1 Roman History and the Ideological Vacuum
5
2 The Fall and Rise of Gaius Geta
33
3 Licinius Macer Juno Moneta and Veiovis
59
4 Romulus Rome of Equals
81
5 Macaulay on Cicero
99
6 Cicero and Varro
107
7 Marcopolis
131
9 The Ethics of Murder
177
10 After the Ides of March
211
Epilogue
235
Bibliography
239
Chronological Index
255
Index Locorum
258
General Index
264
Telif Hakkı

8 The Political Stage
153

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Yazar hakkında (2011)

T. P. Wiseman is Emeritus Professor of Classics, University of Exeter

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