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situation of such responsibility. “He that seeketh to be emine amongst able men (said the ablest of men) hath a great task." This task Mr. Curran fulfilled. In the generous struggle fi distinction, he was surrounded, not by a race of puny comp titors, whom accident or wealth had lifted above their sphere, b by men of surpassing vigour, in whose ranks none but athle: minds could be enrolled. Flood, Yelverton, Daly, Burgh, Per Forbes

, Ponsonby, and, to crown the list, their leader and solita survivor

, Henry Grattan,t-these, all of them great names, a worthy of their country's lasting pride, were the objects of honourable emulation, and to have been rewarded by their apr bation, and admitted an associate of their labours, is in itself eridence of his value, which neither praises can increase,

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situation of such responsibility. “ He that seeketh to bo eminent amongst able men (said the ablest of men) hath a great task.” * This task Mr. Curran fulfilled. In the generous struggle for distinction, he was surrounded, not by a race of puny competitors, whom accident or wealth had lifted above their sphere, but by men of surpassing vigour, in whose ranks none but athletic minds could be enrolled. Flood, Yelverton, Daly, Burgh, Perry, Forbes, Ponsonby, and, to crown the list, their leader and solitary survivor, Henry Grattan,t—these, all of them great names, and worthy of their country's lasting pride, were the objects of his honourable emulation, and to have been rewarded by their approbation, and admitted an associate of their labours, is in itself an evidence of his value, which neither praises can increase, nor envy take away.

* Bacon's Essays.

+ Henry Grattan died (soon after the above was written) on June 4, 1820. He was interred in Westminster Abbey, next to Fox.-M.

APPENDIX.

ANECDOTES OF CURRAN AND HIS FRIENDS.

Vaxx Mr. Curran was in Trinity College, Dublin, he was sumnioned by the Board of Senior Fellows (the moral and literary censors of th Caiversity) and stood before them in all that may be conceived lachrymos in feature, penitent in exterior, yet internally unmoved. After a lon lectare, delivered in Hebrew, and explained into Greek, the accusatio amounted in plain English to this, that he “kept idle women in h chambers," and concluded according to the form of the statute and goo morals. He saw he had no way to escape but by the exercise of his wi and solemnly assured them that the accusation was utterly unfounded, he never in his life kept any woman idle in his rooms,

Bills of indictment had been sent up to a Grand Jury, in the finding o which Mr. Carran was interested. After delay and much hesitation, of the Grand Jurors came into court to explain to the Judge the groun and reasons why it was ignored. Mr. Curran, very much vexed by i stupidity of this person, said, "You, Sir, can have no objection to wr upon the back of the bill, ignoramus, for self and fellow jurors; it w then be a true bill.''

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When the habeas corpus suspension act passed, some time before svar 1798, some person arguing for the propriety and necessity of t law, had thrown out doctrines and opinions unfavourable to the freed of the constitution; he, whose countenance and doctrines were by means agreeable to his hearers, was opposed by one of them, who is "Were you incarcerated for six months under this law you so much es I should be glad to see how you would look." On which Mr. Cu observed, " Perhaps he would not look a bit the worse."

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When Mr. Curran was in Trinity College, Dublin, he was sumnioned by the Board of Senior Fellows (the moral and literary censors of the University) and stood before them in all that may be conceived lachrymose in feature, penitent in exterior, yet internally unmoved. After a long lecture, delivered in Hebrew, and explained into Greek, the accusation amounted in plain English to this, that he “ kept idle women in his chambers," and concluded according to the form of the statute and good morals. He saw he had no way to escape but by the exercise of his wit, and solemnly assured them that the accusation was utterly unfounded, as he never in his life kept any woman idle in his rooms.

Bills of indictment had been sent up to a Grand Jury, in the finding of which Mr. Curran was interested. After delay and much hesitation, one of the Grand Jurors came into court to explain to the Judge the grounds and reasons why it was ignored. Mr. Curran, very much vexed by the stupidity of tbis person, said, “You, Sir, can have no objection to write upon the back of the bill, ignoramus, for self and fellow jurors; it will then be a true bill."

When the habeas corpus suspension act passed, some time before the year 1798, some person arguing for the propriety and necessity of that law, had thrown out doctrines and opinions unfavourable to the freedom of the constitution ; he, whose countenance and doctrines were by no means agreeable to his hearers, was opposed by one of them, who said, "Were you incarcerated for six months under this law you so much extol, I should be glad to see how you would look.On which Mr. Curran observed, "Perhaps he would not look a bit the worse.''

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On Mr. Curran's visit into Scotland, he heard that the priest of the temple of Hymen at Gretna Green no longer forged the chains of wedlock; that he was not now a blacksmith, but a tobacconist. Mr. Curran said, ".So much the better, for he will make the happy couple give quid for

Mr. Egan the lawyer, when chairman of Kilmainham, had entertained expectations that he would be thence promoted to a seat on the bench; he was perceived by Mr. Curran to have paid great attention to some beautiful woman; and his principles not being exactly of the Joseph character, he was jocosely charged by Mr. Curran as to the motives. Egan, fearing that his immorality might become an impediment to his advancement, Lord Manners being at the head of the law department, said, “I am free to confess I am not restrained by morals, but by Manners." "You should rather have said," observed Mr. Curran, " that your bad manners are restrained by his good morals.”

Of some attorney, whose character for litigation fame dealt severel with

, Mr. Curran observed, that every one's hand was raised against him and his against every one. And he thought him like a rat which ha got under the chairs, where every one made a blow at him, but no on could bit him.

Some time after the Union, Mr. Curran was walking by the Parliamen House with a certain member, a friend of his, who had supported the measure ; this gentleman observed that he never passed that hou withont the deepest melancholy and regret. "I do not wonder at it said Mr. Curran, " I never knew a man who had committed murder, w was not haunted by the ghost of the murdered whenever he came the spot at which the foul deed was done."

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