The Natural History of the Insects Mentioned in Shakspeare's Plays: With Upwards of Eighty Illustrations

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A.K. Newman & Company, 1841 - 270 sayfa
 

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Sayfa 11 - Dis's waggon ! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty ; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath ; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength...
Sayfa 10 - And purple all the ground with vernal flowers. Bring the rathe primrose that forsaken dies, The tufted crow-toe, and pale jessamine, The white pink, and the pansy freak'd with jet, The glowing violet, The musk-rose, and the well-attired woodbine, With cowslips wan that hang the pensive head, And every flower that sad embroidery wears : Bid amaranthus all his beauty shed, And daffodillies fill their cups with tears, To strew the laureate hearse where Lycid lies.
Sayfa 90 - He makes sweet music with the enamell'd stones, Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge He overtaketh in his pilgrimage ; And so by many winding nooks he strays, With willing sport, to the wild ocean.
Sayfa 115 - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor...
Sayfa 64 - O'erhang his wavy bed : Now air is hush'd, save where the weak-ey'd bat, With short shrill shriek flits by on leathern wing, Or where the Beetle winds His small but sullen horn, As oft he rises 'midst the twilight path, Against the pilgrim born in heedless hum : Now teach me, Maid compos'd, To breathe some soften'd strain, Whose numbers stealing thro...
Sayfa 161 - Come, let's away to prison : We two alone will sing like birds i' the cage : When thou dost ask me blessing, I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness...
Sayfa 183 - I'll not hurt thee," says my Uncle Toby, rising from his chair, and going across the room with the fly in his hand. " I'll not hurt a hair of thy head. Go," says he, liftinsr up the sash, and opening his hand as he spoke to let it escape.
Sayfa 161 - I'll kneel down And ask of thee forgiveness: so we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too,— Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out;— And take...
Sayfa 9 - Shakespeare, whether life or nature be his subject, shows plainly that he has seen with his own eyes; he gives the image which he receives, not weakened or distorted by the intervention of any other mind; the ignorant feel his representations to be just, and the learned see that they are complete.

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