Pictures of school life and boyhood, selected and ed. by P. Fitzgerald

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Percy Hetherington Fitzgerald
1873
 

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Sayfa 42 - ... before our goal, and comes threatening on, and Warner or Hedge, with young Brooke and the relics of the bull-dogs, break through and carry the ball back ; and old Brooke ranges the field like Job's war-horse : the thickest scrummage parts asunder before his rush, like the waves before a clipper's bows ; his cheery voice rings over the field, and his eye is everywhere. And if these miss the ball, and it rolls dangerously in front of our goal, Crab Jones and his men have seized it and sent it away...
Sayfa 38 - Now's your time, old Brooke, while your men are still fresh. He stands with the ball in his hand, while the two sides form in deep lines opposite one another : he must strike it straight out between them. The lines are thickest close to him, but young Brooke and two or three of his men are shifting up further, where the opposite line is weak.
Sayfa 42 - bravos ' of the School-house attest the pluckiest charge of all that hard-fought day. Warner picks East up lame and half stunned, and he hobbles back into goal, conscious of having played the man. " And now the last minutes are come, and the School gather for their last rush, every boy of the hundred and twenty who has a run left in him. Reckless of the...
Sayfa 77 - ... for the rhyme would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales in the Spectator...
Sayfa 37 - ... boys face it ! Here come two of the bull-dogs, bursting through the outsiders ; in they go, straight to the heart of the scrummage, bent on driving that ball out on the opposite side. That is what they mean to do. My sons, my sons ! you are too hot ; you have gone past the ball, and must struggle now right through the scrummage, and get round and back again to your own side, before you can be of any further use. Here comes young Brooke ; he goes in as straight as you, but keeps his head, and...
Sayfa 33 - The larger body moving to the island goal, are the school-boys in a like predicament. The great mass in the middle are the players-up, both sides mingled together; they are hanging their jackets, and all who mean real work, their hats, waistcoats, neck-handkerchiefs...
Sayfa 26 - ramping, stamping, tearing, swearing Billy Harwood," or any other of the old coaching heroes. Tom's heart beat quick as he passed the great school field or close, with its noble elms, in which several games at football were going on, and tried to take in at once the long line of gray buildings, beginning with the chapel, and ending with the School-house, the residence of the head-master, where the great flag was lazily waving from the highest round tower. And he began already to be proud of being...
Sayfa 56 - Boys will quarrel, and when they quarrel will sometimes fight. Fighting with fists is the natural and English way for English boys to settle their quarrels.
Sayfa 34 - Brooke won the toss, with his lucky halfpenny, and got a choice of goals and kick-off? The new ball you may see lie there quite by itself, in the middle, pointing towards the School or island goal ; in another minute it will be well on its way there. Use that minute in remarking how the School-house side is drilled. You will see in the first place that the...
Sayfa 30 - That's the chapel, you see," said East, "and there just behind it is the place for fights. You see it's most out of the way of the masters, who all live on the other side, and don't come by here after first lesson or callingsover. That's when the fights come off. And all this part where we are is the...

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