The Innocents Abroad

Ön Kapak
Penguin, 30 Tem 2002 - 560 sayfa
Based on a series of letters Mark Twain wrote from Europe to newspapers in San Francisco and New York as a roving correspondent, The Innocents Abroad (1869) is a burlesque of the sentimental travel books popular in the mid-nineteenth century. Twain's fresh and humorous perspective on hallowed European landmarks lacked reverence for the past-the ancient statues of saints on the Cathedral of Notre Dame are "battered and broken-nosed old fellows" and tour guides "interrupt every dream, every pleasant train of thought, with their tiresome cackling." Equally irreverent about American manners (including his own) as he is about European attitudes, Twain ultimately concludes that, for better or worse, "human nature is very much the same all over the world."

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi  - ssperson - LibraryThing

It's certainly difficult to read this in the 21st century, with our ideals of equality and political correctness. This collection of essays are a product of their time, and the writing definitely ... Tam incelemeyi okuyun

LibraryThing Review

Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi  - ssperson - LibraryThing

It's certainly difficult to read this in the 21st century, with our ideals of equality and political correctness. This collection of essays are a product of their time, and the writing definitely ... Tam incelemeyi okuyun

Seçilmiş sayfalar

İçindekiler

CHAPTER I
5
CHAPTER II
12
CHAPTER III
16
CHAPTER IV
20
CHAPTER V
27
CHAPTER VI
33
CHAPTER VII
39
CHAPTER VIII
50
CHAPTER XXXIII
259
CHAPTER XXXIV
269
CHAPTER XXXV
280
CHAPTER XXXVI
285
CHAPTER XXXVII
288
CHAPTER XXXVIII
298
CHAPTER XXXIX
305
CHAPTER XL
310

CHAPTER IX
55
CHAPTER X
60
CHAPTER XI
67
CHAPTER XII
72
CHAPTER XIII
82
CHAPTER XIV
91
CHAPTER XV
98
CHAPTER XVI
108
CHAPTER XVII
113
CHAPTER XVIII
121
CHAPTER XIX
129
CHAPTER XX
141
CHAPTER XXI
147
CHAPTER XXII
154
CHAPTER XXIII
163
CHAPTER XXIV
175
CHAPTER XXV
183
CHAPTER XXVI
191
CHAPTER XXVII
207
CHAPTER XXVIII
218
CHAPTER XXIX
226
CHAPTER XXX
231
CHAPTER XXXI
239
CHAPTER XXXII
247
CHAPTER XLI
318
CHAPTER XLII
324
CHAPTER XLIII
330
CHAPTER XLIV
336
CHAPTER XLV
346
CHAPTER XLVI
357
CHAPTER XLVII
365
CHAPTER XLVIII
377
CHAPTER XLIX
386
CHAPTER L
395
CHAPTER LI
404
CHAPTER LII
416
CHAPTER LIII
422
CHAPTER LIV
435
CHAPTER LV
445
CHAPTER LVI
460
CHAPTER LVII
464
CHAPTER LVIII
471
CHAPTER LIX
484
CHAPTER LX
487
CHAPTER LXI
490
Conclusion
497
EXPLANATORY NOTES
501
Telif Hakkı

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Yazar hakkında (2002)

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimentaland also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Tom Quirk is the Catherine Paine Middlebush Professor of English at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is the editor of the Penguin Classics editions of Mark Twain's Tales, Speeches, Essays, and Sketches (1994) and Ambrose Bierce's Tales of Soldiers and Civilians and Other Stories (2000) and co-editor of The Portable American Realism Reader (1997). His other books include Coming to Grips with Huckleberry Finn (1993), Mark Twain: A Study of the Short Fiction (1997) and Nothing Abstract: Investigations in the American Literary Imagination (2001).


Guy Cardwell has written several books on Mark Twain and is emeritus professor of English at Washington University

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