Eulogy on John Pickering, LL. D., President of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences: Delivered Before the Academy, October 28, 1846

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Metcalf, printers, 1847 - 106 sayfa
 

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Sayfa 4 - ... to cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honor, dignity and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people.30 29 John Adams, Works (CF Adams, edit., Boston, 1851-1856), IV, 302, in footnote, so American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Memoirs, as, XI (1888) , 78.
Sayfa 52 - Thebes, written on papyrus, more than a century before the Christian era, with the impression of a seal or stamp attached to it, and a certificate of registry on its margin, in as regular a manner as the keeper of the registry in the county of Suffolk would certify to a deed of land in the city of Boston, at this day.
Sayfa 93 - Latin, of which he spoke the first five. He was less familiar, though well acquainted, with Dutch, Swedish, Danish, and Hebrew, — and had explored, with various degrees of care, the Arabic, Turkish, Syriac, Persian, Coptic, Sanscrit, Chinese, Cochin-Chinese, Russian, Egyptian hieroglyphics, the Malay in several dialects, and particularly the Indian languages of America and the Polynesian Islands. The sarcasm of Hudibras on the " barren ground " supposed congenial to " Hebrew roots " is refuted...
Sayfa 22 - ... students pursued the more advanced mathematics during the latter part of the college course. A glimpse of light on this subject is thrown by the following quotation from the eulogy of John Pickering: " Great as was his enthusiasm for classical learning, he had in college as real a love for the study of mathematics, and highly distinguished himself in this department. Near the close of his Senior year he received the honor of a mathematical part, which appeared to give him more pleasure than all...
Sayfa 105 - ... American army ; and, being unacquainted with the English language, he was making inquiries for some young man who could speak English, to accompany him as his secretary. He was informed of young Du Ponceau, who happened then to be in Paris, and an arrangement was made with him accordingly. We recollect to have heard Mr. Du Ponceau say, that at that time, though he had never been out of France, he understood and could speak English as perfectly as he ever could afterwards.
Sayfa 52 - Report of the Committee of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts, on the subject of IMPRESSED SEAMEN : with the Evidence and Documents accompanying it.
Sayfa 90 - ... were marked by peculiar care ; his brief was very elaborate. On questions of law he was learned and profound, but his manner in court was excelled by his matter. The experience of his long life never enabled him to overcome the native, childlike diffidence which made him shrink from public displays. He developed his views with clearness, and an invariable regard to their logical sequence ; but he did not press them home by energy of manner or any of the ardors of eloquence. " His mind was rather...
Sayfa 106 - Beyond the immediate circle of family and friends, he will be mourned by the bar, amongst whom his daily life was passed; by the municipality of Boston, whose legal adviser he was; by clients, who depended upon his counsels; by all good citizens, who were charmed by the abounding virtues of his private life ; by his country, who will cherish his name more than gold or silver; by the distant islands of the Pacific, who will bless his labors in every written word that they read; finally, by the company...
Sayfa 104 - ... he was a Protestant, and worshipped at one of the Presbyterian churches in Philadelphia. It happened about this period of his life, that the wellknown Baron Steuben arrived in Paris on his way to the United States, to join the American army ; and, being unacquainted with the English language, he was making inquiries for some young man who could speak English, to accompany him as his secretary. He was informed of young Du Ponceau, who happened then to be in Paris, and an arrangement was made with...
Sayfa 60 - Classics," translated from the Latin of Professor Wyttenbach. In the course of the remarks, with which he introduces the translation, he urges with conclusive force the importance of raising the standard of education in our country. " We are too apt," he says, " to consider ourselves as an insulated people, as...

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