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SONNET. LXIIII.

OM/MING to kisse her lyps, (such grace I found)

Me seemd I smelt a gardin of sweet flowres : at dainty odours from them threw around r damzels fit to decke their louers bowres.

lips did smell lyke vnto Gillyflowers, er ruddy cheekes, lyke vnto Roses red: er snowy browes lyke budded Bellamoures, her louely eyes lyke Pincks but newly spred, r goodly bosome lyke a Strawberry bed, her neck lyke to a bounch of Cullambynes : her breft lyke lillyes, ere theyr leaues be shed, her nipples lyke yong blossomd Iessemynes, ich fragrant flowres doe giue most odorous smell, but her sweet odour did them all excell.

SONNET. LXV.

T

HE/doubt which ye misdeeme, fayre loue, is vaine

That fondly feare to loose your liberty, when loosing one, two liberties ye gayne,

and make him bond that bondage earst dyd fly. Sweet be the bands, the which true loue doth tye,

without constraynt or dread of any ill: the gentle birde feeles no captiuity

within her cage, but singes and feeds her fill. There pride dare not approch, nor discord spill

the league twixt them, that loyal loue hath bound : but simple truth and mutuall good will,

seekes with sweet peace to falue each others woud There fayth doth fearlesse dwell in brasen towre,

And spotlesse pleasure builds her sacred bowre.

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SONNET. LXVI.
| all those happy blessings, which ye haue,

with plenteous hand by heauen vpon you thrown: this one disparagement they to you gaue,

that ye your loue lent to so meane a one. Yee whose high worths surpassing paragon,

could not on earth haue found one fit for mate, ne but in heauen matchable to none,

why did ye stoup vnto so lowly state. But ye thereby much greater glory gate,

then had ye sorted with a princes pere :
for now your light doth more it felfe dilate,

and in my darknesse greater doth appeare. Yet since your light hath once enlumind me,

with my reflex yours shall encreased be.

L

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SONNET. LXVII.
YKE / as a huntsman after weary chace,

Seeing the game from him escapt away: fits downe to rest him in some shady place,

with panting hounds beguiled of their pray. So after long pursuit and vaine affay,

when I all weary had the chace forfooke, the gentle deare returnd the selfe-fame way,

thinking to quench her thirst at the next brooke. There she beholding me with mylder looke,

sought not to fly, but fearlesse still did bide : till I in hand her yet halfe trembling tooke,

and with her owne goodwill hir fyrmely tyde. Strange thing me seemd to see a beast so wyld,

so goodly wonne with her owne will beguyld.

SONNET. LXVIII.

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OST / glorious Lord of lyfe that on this day,

Didst make thy triumph ouer death and sin: and hauing harrowd hell didst bring away,

captiuity thence captiue vs to win. This ioyous day, deare Lord, with ioy begin,

and grant that we for whom thou diddest dye being with thy deare blood clene washt from sin,

may liue for euer in felicity. And that thy loue we weighing worthily,

may likewise loue thee for the same againe : and for thy fake that all lyke deare didst buy,

with loue may one another entertayne. So let vs loue, deare loue, lyke as we ought,

loue is the lesson which the Lord vs taught.

THE

SONNET. LXIX.
HE / famous warriors of the anticke world,

vsed Trophees to erect in stately wize : in which they would the records haue enrold,

of theyr great deeds and valarous emprize. What trophee then shall I most fit deuize,

in which I may record the memory
of my loues conqueft, peerelesse beauties prise,

adorn'd with honour, loue, and chastity. Euen this verse vowd to eternity,

shall be thereof immortall moniment:
and tell her prayse to all posterity,
that
may

admire such worlds rare wonderment. The happy purchase of my glorious spoile,

gotten at last with labour and long toyle.

FR

SONNET. LXX.
RESH / spring the herald of loues mighty king,

in whose cote armour richly are displayd, all sorts of flowers the which on earth do spring

in goodly colours gloriously arrayd. Goe to my loue, where she is carelesse layd,

yet in her winters bowre not well awake : tell her the ioyous time wil not be staid

vnlesse she doe him by the forelock take. Bid her therefore her selfe soone ready make,

to wayt on loue amongst his louely crew : where euery one, that misseth then her make,

shall be by him amearst with penance dew. Make haft therefore sweet loue, whileft it is prime,

for none can call againe the passed time.

I

SONNET. LXXI.
| TOY to see how in your drawen work,
your selfe vnto the Bee

ye
doe

compare ; and me vnto the Spyder that doth lurke,

in close awayt to catch her vnaware.
Right so your selfe were caught in cunning snare

of a deare foe, and thralled to his loue :
in whose streight bands ye now captiued are

so firmely, that ye neuer may remoue. But as your worke is wouen all aboue,

with woodbynd flowers and fragrant Eglantine : so sweet your prifon you in time shall proue,

with many deare delights bedecked fyne. And all thensforth eternall peace shall see

betweene the Spyder and the gentle Bee.

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SONNET, LXXII.
FT/when my spirit doth spred her bolder winges,

In mind to mount vp to the purest sky: it down is weighd with thoght of earthly things and clogd with burden of mortality, here when that souerayne beauty it doth spy, resembling heauens glory in her light : drawne with sweet pleasures bayt, it back doth fly, and vnto heauen forgets her former flight. iere my fraile fancy fed with full delight, doth bath in blisse and mantleth most at ease : ne thinks of other heauen, but how it might her harts desire with most contentment please. art need not wish none other happinesse, but here on earth to haue such heuens bliffe.

3

SONNET. LXXIII.
EING / my selfe captyued here in care,

My hart, whom none with seruile bands can tye: but the fayre tresses of your golden hayre, breaking his prison forth to you doth fly. ike as a byrd that in ones hand doth spy desired food, to it doth make his flight: euen so my hart, that wont on your fayre eye to feed his fill, flyes backe vnto your sight. oe you him take, and in your bosome bright, gently encage, that he may be your thrall : perhaps he there may learne with rare delight, to sing your name and prayses ouer all, hat it hereafter may you not repent, him lodging in your bosome to haue lent.

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