Cicero's epistles to Atticus, with notes, tr by W. Guthrie, 1. cilt

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Sayfa 180 - ... misfortunes ? Did ever man fall from so elevated a station, in so good a cause, with such advantages of genius, experience, and popularity, or so guarded by the interest of every worthy patriot ? Is it possible I should forget who I have been ; that I should not feel who I am ; what glory, what honor, what children, what fortunes, and what a brother I have lost? A brother, that you may know my calamities to be unexampled, whom I loved, whom I have ever loved more than myself; yet have I been...
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Sayfa 4 - But there cannot be a better proof,' adds he, ' of the delightfulness of the place, than that it ' is now possessed by a convent of Monks, and called The Villa. ' of St. Dominic. Strange revolution, to see Cicero's porticos ' converted to Monkish cloisters ! the seat of the most refined " Mr. Jebb wrote a particular friend, in reference to the above friend, on the 23d of that month, (April,) as follows: — ' The struggle was vehement, but it was resolved, it seems, that I was to have no share in...
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Sayfa 68 - ... know nothing of, is a tribune of the people ; but you may know him, for he is of your tribe, and his father Sextus used to be the paymaster of your election money. This man has transferred Clodius to the commons ; and prevailed with all the tribes of the people to pass a vote in the Campus Martius concerning his adopted son. I gave him a proper reception, as usual, but the fellow is incorrigibly stupid. Metellus proves an excellent consul, and my very good friend ; but he hurts his authority,...
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