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CONTENTS

1. The Platonic Drama—Two elements to be distinguished in it: Argumentative

Conversation and Myth

Pages 1-4

2. General remarks on uvoología, or Story-telling- Primitive Story-telling

described as åvopwroloyla kal swoloria—Stories, or Myths, are (1) Simply

Anthropological and Zoological ; (2) Aetiological ; (3) Eschatological—A

Myth, as distinguished from an Allegory, has no Moral or Other-

meaning

4-20

3. Plato's Myths distinguished from Allegories—To what experience, to what

“Part of the Soul,” does the Platonic Myth appeal ? To that part which

expresses itself, not in “theoretic judgments,” but in “value-judgments,"
or rather "value-feelings ”—The effect produced in us by the Platonic
Myth is essentially that produced by Poetry ; “Transcendental Feeling,"
the sense of the overshadowing presence of “That which was, and is, and
ever shall be,” is awakened in us—Passages from the Poets, quoted to
exemplify the production of this effect .

20-39

4. “Transcendental Feeling” explained genetically as the reflection in Conscious.

ness of the Life of the “ Vegetative Part of the Soul," the fundamental

principle in us, and in all living creatures, which silently, in timeless

sleep, makes the assumption on which the whole rational life of Conduct

and Science rests, the assumption that “Life is worth living," that there is

a Cosmos, in which, and of which, it is good to be—“Transcendental

Feeling” is thus Solemn Sense of Timeless Being, and Conviction that

Life is good, and is the beginning and end of Metaphysics—It is with the

production of the first of these two phases of “Transcendental Feeling"

that the Platonic Myth, and Poetry generally, are chiefly concerned-

The Platonic Myth rouses and regulates this mode of “Transcendental

Feeling" for the use of Conduct and Science

39-42

5. The Platonic Myth rouses and regulates “Transcendental Feeling" by

(1) Imaginative Representation of Ideas of Reason,” and (2) Imaginative

Deduction of "Categories of the Understanding” and “Moral Virtues"

- Distinction between “Ideas” and “Categories ” implicit in Plato-

Kant's distinction explained—Why does Plato employ Myth when he

"represents” Ideas of Reason, Soul, Cosmos, God, and when he

“deduces” Categories of the Understanding and Moral Virtues ? 42-51

6. Plato's treatment of the “Idea of God”

51-60

77

79-93

.

.

THE GORGIAS MYTH

Context

Translation

115

117-125

OBSERVATIONS ON THE GORGIAS MYTH

162-169

4. The great philosophical question raised and solved in the Myth, How to

reconcile “ Free Will ” with the "Reign of Law”

169-172

THE POLITICUS MYTH

Introductory Remarks

Context

Translation

Translation of the Myth of the Golden Age

173-174

175

177-191

193-195

OBSERVATIONS ON THE POLITICUS MYTH

1. Relation of the Politicus Myth to the "Science" of Plato's day 196-197

2. Is Plato “in earnest” in supposing that God, from time to time, withdraws

from the government of the World ?

197-198

3. Resurrection and Metempsychosis

198-200

4. "The Problem of Evil” raised in the Politicus Myth-How does Plato

suppose the solution of this problem to be furthered by an Aetiological

Myth like that of the Politicus ?—The value of Aetiological Myth as

helping us to “solve" a "universal difficulty" as distinguished from a

"particular difficulty” — It helps us to "put by” the former kind of

difficulty—The Kalewala quoted to illustrate the function of Aetiological Myth

The Story of the Birth of Iron-Transition from the Politicus Myth to the “Creation Myths” strictly so called, the Protagoras Myth, and the Discourse of Timaeus

Pages 200-211

THE PROTAGORAS MYTHV

Context of the Myth
Translation

212-213 215-219

OBSERVATIONS ON THE PROTAGORAS MYTH 1. Is it a "Platonic Myth,” or only a "Sophistic Apologue"?–It is a true Myth, as setting forth a priori elements in man's experience .

220-222 2. It sets forth the distinction between the “mechanical" and the “teleo

logical” explanation of the World and its parts-It raises the question discussed in Kant's Critique of Judgment

222-226 3. Account given in the Myth of the Origin of Virtue as distinguished from Art

226-228 4. A Sculptured Myth, the Prometheus Sarcophagus in the Capitoline Museum.

228-229 5. The difference between Myth and Allegory—Sketch of the History of Alle

gorical Interpretation-The interpreters of Homer and of Greek Mythology -Philo—The Christian Fathers—The Neo-Platonists-Dante--Plato's Allegory of the Cave (which is a Myth as well as an Allegory)-His Allegory of the Disorderly Crew - Allegory and Myth compared with Ritual

230-258

THE TIMAEUS

Context.
Translation

259 261-297

OBSERVATIONS ON THE TIMAEUS 1. General observations on its scope 2. Purification and Metempsychosis 3. On the Creation of Souls

298-302 302-304 804-305

THE PHAEDRUS MYTH

Context of the Myth
Translation

306-307
309-335

OBSERVATIONS ON THE PHAEDRUS MYTH 1. Preliminary :

336 2. The Phaedrus Myth as giving a “Deduction" of the Categories of the Understanding-But it also sets forth the Ideas of Reason

337-339

INTRODUCTION

1. THE PLATONIC DRAMA

THE Platonic Dialogue may be broadly described as a Drama in which speech is the action, and Socrates and his companions are the actors. The speech in which the action consists is mainly that of argumentative conversation in which, although Socrates or another may take a leading part, yet everybody has his say. The conversation or argument is always about matters which can be profitably discussed—that is, matters on which men form workaday opinions which discussion may show to be right or wrong, wholly or in part.

But it is only mainly that the Platonic Drama consists in argumentative conversation. It contains another element, the Myth, which, though not ostensibly present in some Dialogues, is so striking in others, some of them the greatest, that we are compelled to regard it, equally with the argumentative conversation, as essential to Plato's philosophical style.

The Myth is a fanciful tale, sometimes traditional, sometimes newly invented, with which Socrates or some other interlocutor interrupts or concludes the argumentative conversation in which the movement of the Drama mainly consists.

The object of this work is to examine the examples of the Platonic Myth in order to discover its function in the organism of the Platonic Drama. That Myth is an organic part of the Platonic Drama, not an added ornament, is a point about which the experienced reader of Plato can have no doubt. The Sophists probably ornamented their discourses and made

1 Ct. Cratylus, 387 Β, το λέγειν μία τις εστι των πράξεων.

B

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