Human Rights and the End of Empire: Britain and the Genesis of the European Convention

Ön Kapak
Oxford University Press, 2004 - 1161 sayfa
The European Convention on Human Rights of 1950 established the most effective international system of human rights protection ever created. This is the first book that gives a comprehensive account of how it came into existence, of the part played in its genesis by the British government, and
of its significance for Britain in the period between 1953 and 1966.
 

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İçindekiler

Human Rights Fundamental Freedoms and the World of the Common Law
1
The Mechanisms of Repression
54
The International Protection of Individual Rights Before 1939
91
Codes of Human Rights
157
Human Rights and the Structure of the Brave New World
221
The Burdens of Empire
276
The Foreign Office Establishes a Policy
323
Becketts Bill and the Loss of the Initiative
390
The Rival Texts
649
The Conclusion of Negotiations and the Rearguard Action
711
The First Protocol
754
Ratification and its Consequences
808
Emergencies and Derogations
874
The First Cyprus Case
924
The Outcome of the Two Applications
988
Coming In Rather Reluctantly From the Cold
1053

Conflict Abroad and at Home
462
The Growing Disillusion
511
Britain and the Western Option
543
From the Brussels Treaty to the Council of Europe
597

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Yazar hakkında (2004)


A. W. Brian Simpson is Charles F. and Edith J. Clyne Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School.

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