Letters of Samuel Johnson, LL.D., 2. cilt

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Clarendon Press, 1892
 

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Sayfa 406 - MADAM, If I interpret your letter right, you are ignominiously married; if it is yet undone, let us once more talk together. If you have abandoned your children and your religion, God forgive your wickedness: if you have forfeited your fame and your country, may your folly do no further mischief.
Sayfa 192 - Oft in danger, yet alive, We are come to thirty-five; Long may better years arrive, Better years than thirty-five. Could philosophers contrive Life to stop at thirty-five, Time his hours should never drive O'er the bounds of thirty-five. High to soar, and deep to dive, Nature gives at thirty-five. Ladies, stock and tend your hive, Trifle not at thirty-five: For howe'er we boast and strive, 156 Life declines from thirty-five. He that ever hopes to thrive Must begin by thirty-five; And all who wisely...
Sayfa 287 - I have sent you back Mr. Crabbe's poem ; which " I read with great delight. It is original, vigorous, and elegant. " The alterations which I have made, I do not require him to " adopt ; for my lines are, perhaps, not often better [than] his "own: but he may take mine and his own together, and "perhaps, between them, produce something better than "either. — He is not to think his copy wantonly defaced; a "wet sponge will wash all the red lines away, and leave the "pages clean.
Sayfa 301 - I was alarmed, and prayed God, that however he might afflict my body, he would spare my understanding. This prayer, that I might try the integrity of my faculties, I made in Latin verse. The lines were not very good, but I knew them not to be very good: I made them easily, and concluded myself to be unimpaired in my faculties.
Sayfa 301 - I think repeated it; but all was vain. I then went to bed, and, strange as it may seem, I think slept. When I saw light, it was time to contrive what I should do. Though God stopped my speech he left me my hand; I enjoyed a mercy which was not granted to my dear friend Lawrence, who now perhaps overlooks me as I am writing, and rejoices that I have what he wanted. My first note was necessarily to my servant, who came in talking, and could not immediately comprehend why he should read what I put into...
Sayfa 408 - When Queen Mary took the resolution of sheltering herself in England, the Archbishop of St. Andrew's attempting to dissuade her, attended on her journey and when they came to the irremeable stream that separated the two kingdoms, walked by her side into the water, in the middle of which he seized her bridle, and with earnestness proportioned to her danger and his own affection, pressed her to return.
Sayfa 170 - At night they set fire to the Fleet, and to the King's-Bench, and I know not how many other places; and one might see the glare of conflagration fill the sky from many parts. The sight was dreadful. Some people were threatened : Mr. Strahan advised me to take care of myself. Such a time of terrour you have been happy in not seeing.
Sayfa 350 - To those that have lived long together, every thing heard and every thing seen recals some pleasure communicated, or some benefit conferred, some petty quarrel, or some slight endearment. Esteem of great powers, or amiable qualities newly discovered, may embroider a day or a week, but a friendship of twenty years is interwoven with the texture of life.
Sayfa 209 - ... mind. I am not without my part of the calamity. No death since that of my wife has ever oppressed me like this. But let us remember, that •we are in the hands of Him who knows when to give and when to take away; who will look upon us with mercy through all our variations of existence, and who invites us to call on him in the day of trouble. Call upon him in this great revolution of life, and call with confidence. You will then find comfort for the -past, and support for the future.
Sayfa 361 - Life, to be worthy of a rational being, must be always in progression ; we must always purpose to do more or better than in time past. The mind is enlarged and elevated by mere purposes, though they end as they begin by airy contemplation. We compare and judge, though we do not practise.

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