Lectures on the History of Rome from the First Punic War to the Death of Constantine. In a Series of Lectures, Including an Introductory Course on the Sources and Study of Roman History, 2. cilt

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Taylor and Walton, 1844
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Sayfa 269 - Numantines had consumed all their provisions, after they had for some time been living upon the corpses of their enemies and their own friends, and had experienced all the horrors and miseries such as we have seen inflicted upon Missolonghi, they at length wished to surrender. Scipio demanded that they should lay down their arms and surrender at discretion. The Numantines then begged for a truce of three days to consider the proposal. This time they employed, especially the persons of the higher...
Sayfa 38 - ... in silence. The common account of the death of Regulus may be effaced from the pages of history without any scruple. It may be that it was taken from Naevius, for Diodorus was not acquainted with it, as is clear from his fragments. He knew the history of Rome but very imperfectly, and only...
Sayfa 67 - ... once to exert themselves no longer against what they call fate, as if thereby they could avenge themselves upon fate ; others grow desponding and hopeless ; but a third class of men will rouse themselves just at such moments, and say to themselves, " The more difficult it is to attain my ends, the more honourable it will be;" and this is a maxim which every one should impress upon himself as a law.
Sayfa 376 - The victory which the rebels had thus gained was followed by the wildest cruelties. Marius had a body-guard of slaves, whom he sent out to murder those whom he wished to get rid of. In this manner all the most distinguished persons of...
Sayfa xi - Niebuhr, from the undertaking, had I not been favoured by circumstances, among which I mention with gratitude the advice, encouragement, and assistance of my distinguished friends, Bishop Thirlwall, the Chevalier Bunsen, the Rev. Philip Smith, and Dr. William Smith. In order to put the reader in a position fully to understand these preliminary remarks, it will be necessary for me to give some account of the materials I had to work upon, and of the principles I have endeavoured to follow. The notes,...
Sayfa 68 - ... American war, it was thought in England that the ignominious peace of Paris had put an end to the greatness of England, Pitt undertook, with double courage, the restoration of his country, and displayed his extraordinary powers. It was in the same spirit that Hamilcar acted: he turned his eyes to Spain ; he formed the plan of making Spain a province which should co'mpensate for the loss of Sicily and Sardinia. " The weakness of Carthage consisted in her having no armies; and it was a grand conception...
Sayfa 38 - Macaulay, he was a person entirely devoid of principle. lus in a frightful manner, and that the tribunes summoned the senate, and compelled the monsters to release one of the hostages who was kept shut up in a case containing the dead body of his comrade. Now, as both Palmerius and Beaufort justly observe, if the Carthagenians actually did torture Regulus to death, it was only an act of retaliation. It was probably this crime committed by the family of Regulus, which caused the fabrication of the...
Sayfa 308 - Eloq. 42. it, and shown that so far from being a factious demagogue, he was a virtuous and upright citizen. " There are two classes of men, the one consisting of those who are sincere and open, and seek and love the beautiful and sublime, who delight in eminent men, and see in them the glory of their age and nation; the other comprising those who think only of themselves, are envious, jealous, and sometimes very unhappy creatures, without having a distinct will of their own: they cannot bear to see...
Sayfa 37 - Beaufort afterwards adduced further reasons to prove that this tragedy is a complete fiction,2 and that it was probably invented because the Romans allowed that the terms of peace proposed by Regulus were abominable, and that he had to make amends for his shameful conduct.
Sayfa 396 - As regards the manners and mode of life of the Romans, their great object at this time was the acquisition and possession of money. Their moral conduct, which had been corrupt enough before the social war, became still more so by their systematic plunder and rapine. Immense riches were accumulated and squandered upon brutal pleasures. The simplicity of the old manners and mode of living had been abandoned for Greek luxuries and frivolities...

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